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Stamford Heroes

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Stamford Area Medal of Honor Recipients

We always find it fitting at this time to remember some of those who came before to make the world we have available. I am sure there are thousands more, unsung, modest, walking among us even today who deserve the same recognition. These are a few of our Stamford Medal of Honor recipients, as reported at the Connnecticut Military Department. If you have someone else you’d like to remember and celebrate this day, please forward his information, and I’ll get it up here.

Nicholas Fox

Nicholas Fox

Nicholas Fox

  • Rank and organization: Private, Company H, 28th Connecticut Infantry
  • Place and date: At Port Hudson, La., 14 June 1863
  • Entered service at: Greenwich, Conn.
  • Date of issue: 1 April 1898
  • Citation: Made 2 trips across an open space, in the face of the enemy’s concentrated fire, and secured water for the sick and wounded.

https://history.army.mil/moh/civilwar_af.html#FOXN

John D. Magrath

John D. Magrath

John D. Magrath

  • Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Company G, 85th Infantry, 10th Mountain Division
  • Place and date: Near Castel d’Aiano, Italy, 14 April 1945
  • Entered service at: East Norwalk, Conn.
  • G.O. No.: 71, 17 July 1946
  • Citation: He displayed conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty when his company was pinned down by heavy artillery, mortar, and small arms fire, near Castel d’Aiano, Italy. Volunteering to act as a scout, armed with only a rifle, he charged headlong into withering fire, killing 2 Germans and wounding 3 in order to capture a machinegun. Carrying this enemy weapon across an open field through heavy fire, he neutralized 2 more machinegun nests; he then circled behind 4 other Germans, killing them with a burst as they were firing on his company. Spotting another dangerous enemy position to this right, he knelt with the machinegun in his arms and exchanged fire with the Germans until he had killed 2 and wounded 3. The enemy now poured increased mortar and artillery fire on the company’s newly won position. Pfc. Magrath fearlessly volunteered again to brave the shelling in order to collect a report of casualties. Heroically carrying out this task, he made the supreme sacrifice–a climax to the valor and courage that are in keeping with highest traditions of the military service.

https://history.army.mil/moh/wwII-m-s.html#MAGRATH

George Rose

George Rose

George Rose

  • Rank and organization: Seaman, U.S. Navy
  • Accredited to: Connecticut
  • G.O. No.: 55, 19 July 1901
  • Citation: In the presence of the enemy during the battles at Peking, China, 13, 20, 21 and 22 June 1900. Throughout this period, Rose distinguished himself by meritorious conduct. While stationed as a crewmember of the U.S.S. Newark, he was part of its landing force that went ashore off Taku, China. on 31 May 1900, he was in a party of 6 under John McCloy (MH) which took ammunition from the Newark to Tientsin. On 10 June 1900, he was one of a party that carried dispatches from LaFa to Yongstsum at night. On the 13th he was one of a few who fought off a large force of the enemy saving the Main baggage train from destruction. On the 20th and 21st he was engaged in heavy fighting against the Imperial Army being always in the first rank. On the 22d he showed gallantry in the capture of the Siku Arsenal. He volunteered to go to the nearby village which was occupied by the enemy to secure medical supplies urgently required. The party brought back the supplies carried by newly taken prisoners.

https://history.army.mil/moh/chinare.html#ROSE

George Harry Rose was born in Stamford, Connecticut on 28 February 1880. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy from that state and served on the cruiser USS Newark as a Seaman. During the China Relief Expedition of 1900, Newark, serving as flagship for the Assistant Commander of the Asiatic Station, was brought to the Peking area to protect Americans who were under threat from the rebellious Boxers. Rose voluntarily took part in land operations there in May and June 1900, distinguishing himself on several occasions, among them carrying dispatches on 10 June, helping to fight off an attack on his unit’s baggage train on the 13th, engaging in combat on 20-22 June, and obtaining medical supplies from an enemy-held village. For his “meritorious conduct” on 13, 20, 21 and 22 June, he was awarded the Medal of Honor.

George Rose received a commission as an Ensign in the Naval Reserve in 1917. He served in the Third Naval District (New York City region) during World War I and was promoted to Lieutenant (Junior Grade) in mid-1918. On 15 July 1929 he became a Lieutenant Commander in the Merchant Marine Naval Reserve. George H. Rose died on 7 December 1932 in Newark, New Jersey and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.

https://web.archive.org/web/20060819220406/http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/pers-us/uspers-r/g-rose.htm

David H. Scofield

David H. Scofield

  • Rank and organization: Quartermaster Sergeant, Company K. 5th N.Y., U.S. Cavalry
  • Place and date: At Cedar Creek, Va., 19 October 1864
  • Date of issue: 26 October 1864
  • Citation: The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Quartermaster Sergeant David H. Scofield, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 19 October 1864, while serving with Company K, 5th New York Cavalry, in action at Cedar Creek, Virginia, for capture of flag of 13th Virginia Infantry (Confederate States of America)

https://history.army.mil/moh/civilwar_sz.html#SCOFIELD

SCOFIELD, DAVID S.—age, 20 years. Enlisted, October 22, 1861, at Connecticut; mustered in as sergeant, Co. K, October 31, 1861, to serve three years; re-enlisted as private, Co. K, January 1, 1864; appointed regimental quartermaster sergeant, July 1, 1864; reduced to ranks, June 8, 1865, for gross neglect of duty, and assigned to Co. K; mustered out with company, July 19, 1865, as Scofield, David H.

Annual Report of the Adjutant-General of the State of New York For the Year 1894: Registers of the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Regiments of Cavalry, N.Y. Vols., in War of the Rebellion, Vol. II, p. 290 (1895 Albany)

Homer L. Wise

Homer L. Wise

  • Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant. U.S. Army, Company L, 142d Infantry, 36th Infantry Division
  • Place and date: Magliano, Italy, 14 June 1944
  • Entered service al: Baton Rouge, La.
  • G.O. No.: 90, 8 December 1944
  • Citation: While his platoon was pinned down by enemy small-arms fire from both flanks, he left his position of comparative safety and assisted in carrying 1 of his men, who had been seriously wounded and who lay in an exposed position, to a point where he could receive medical attention. The advance of the platoon was resumed but was again stopped by enemy frontal fire. A German officer and 2 enlisted men, armed with automatic weapons, threatened the right flank. Fearlessly exposing himself, he moved to a position from which he killed all 3 with his submachinegun. Returning to his squad, he obtained an Ml rifle and several antitank grenades, then took up a position from which he delivered accurate fire on the enemy holding up the advance. As the battalion moved forward it was again stopped by enemy frontal and flanking fire. He procured an automatic rifle and, advancing ahead of his men, neutralized an enemy machinegun with his fire. When the flanking fire became more intense he ran to a nearby tank and exposing himself on the turret, restored a jammed machinegun to operating efficiency and used it so effectively that the enemy fire from an adjacent ridge was materially reduced thus permitting the battalion to occupy its objective.

https://history.army.mil/moh/wwII-t-z.html#WISE

Stamford Area Heroes

in Heroes/History/Holidays/Uncategorized 189 views

With Veteran’s Day upon us again, we remember Stamford’s Medal of Honor Recipients. These are as reported at the Connnecticut Military Department. If you have a local hero you’d like to add to this list, please reach out.

Memorial Day 2018

Stamford Area Medal of Honor Recipients

Nicholas Fox

Nicholas Fox

  • Rank and organization: Private, Company H, 28th Connecticut Infantry
  • Place and date: At Port Hudson, La., 14 June 1863
  • Entered service at: Greenwich, Conn.
  • Date of issue: 1 April 1898
  • Citation: Made 2 trips across an open space, in the face of the enemy’s concentrated fire, and secured water for the sick and wounded.

https://history.army.mil/moh/civilwar_af.html#FOXN

John D. Magrath

John D. Magrath

  • Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Company G, 85th Infantry, 10th Mountain Division
  • Place and date: Near Castel d’Aiano, Italy, 14 April 1945
  • Entered service at: East Norwalk, Conn.
  • G.O. No.: 71, 17 July 1946
  • Citation: He displayed conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty when his company was pinned down by heavy artillery, mortar, and small arms fire, near Castel d’Aiano, Italy. Volunteering to act as a scout, armed with only a rifle, he charged headlong into withering fire, killing 2 Germans and wounding 3 in order to capture a machinegun. Carrying this enemy weapon across an open field through heavy fire, he neutralized 2 more machinegun nests; he then circled behind 4 other Germans, killing them with a burst as they were firing on his company. Spotting another dangerous enemy position to this right, he knelt with the machinegun in his arms and exchanged fire with the Germans until he had killed 2 and wounded 3. The enemy now poured increased mortar and artillery fire on the company’s newly won position. Pfc. Magrath fearlessly volunteered again to brave the shelling in order to collect a report of casualties. Heroically carrying out this task, he made the supreme sacrifice–a climax to the valor and courage that are in keeping with highest traditions of the military service.

https://history.army.mil/moh/wwII-m-s.html#MAGRATH

George Rose

George Rose

  • Rank and organization: Seaman, U.S. Navy
  • Accredited to: Connecticut
  • G.O. No.: 55, 19 July 1901
  • Citation: In the presence of the enemy during the battles at Peking, China, 13, 20, 21 and 22 June 1900. Throughout this period, Rose distinguished himself by meritorious conduct. While stationed as a crewmember of the U.S.S. Newark, he was part of its landing force that went ashore off Taku, China. on 31 May 1900, he was in a party of 6 under John McCloy (MH) which took ammunition from the Newark to Tientsin. On 10 June 1900, he was one of a party that carried dispatches from LaFa to Yongstsum at night. On the 13th he was one of a few who fought off a large force of the enemy saving the Main baggage train from destruction. On the 20th and 21st he was engaged in heavy fighting against the Imperial Army being always in the first rank. On the 22d he showed gallantry in the capture of the Siku Arsenal. He volunteered to go to the nearby village which was occupied by the enemy to secure medical supplies urgently required. The party brought back the supplies carried by newly taken prisoners.

https://history.army.mil/moh/chinare.html#ROSE


George Harry Rose was born in Stamford, Connecticut on 28 February 1880. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy from that state and served on the cruiser USS Newark as a Seaman. During the China Relief Expedition of 1900, Newark, serving as flagship for the Assistant Commander of the Asiatic Station, was brought to the Peking area to protect Americans who were under threat from the rebellious Boxers. Rose voluntarily took part in land operations there in May and June 1900, distinguishing himself on several occasions, among them carrying dispatches on 10 June, helping to fight off an attack on his unit’s baggage train on the 13th, engaging in combat on 20-22 June, and obtaining medical supplies from an enemy-held village. For his “meritorious conduct” on 13, 20, 21 and 22 June, he was awarded the Medal of Honor.

George Rose received a commission as an Ensign in the Naval Reserve in 1917. He served in the Third Naval District (New York City region) during World War I and was promoted to Lieutenant (Junior Grade) in mid-1918. On 15 July 1929 he became a Lieutenant Commander in the Merchant Marine Naval Reserve. George H. Rose died on 7 December 1932 in Newark, New Jersey and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.

https://web.archive.org/web/20060819220406/http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/pers-us/uspers-r/g-rose.htm

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David H. Scofield

  • Rank and organization: Quartermaster Sergeant, Company K. 5th N.Y., U.S. Cavalry
  • Place and date: At Cedar Creek, Va., 19 October 1864
  • Date of issue: 26 October 1864
  • Citation: The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Quartermaster Sergeant David H. Scofield, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 19 October 1864, while serving with Company K, 5th New York Cavalry, in action at Cedar Creek, Virginia, for capture of flag of 13th Virginia Infantry (Confederate States of America)

https://history.army.mil/moh/civilwar_sz.html#SCOFIELD


SCOFIELD, DAVID S.—age, 20 years. Enlisted, October 22, 1861, at Connecticut; mustered in as sergeant, Co. K, October 31, 1861, to serve three years; re-enlisted as private, Co. K, January 1, 1864; appointed regimental quartermaster sergeant, July 1, 1864; reduced to ranks, June 8, 1865, for gross neglect of duty, and assigned to Co. K; mustered out with company, July 19, 1865, as Scofield, David H.

Annual Report of the Adjutant-General of the State of New York For the Year 1894: Registers of the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Regiments of Cavalry, N.Y. Vols., in War of the Rebellion, Vol. II, p. 290 (1895 Albany)

Homer L. Wise

Homer L. Wise

  • Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant. U.S. Army, Company L, 142d Infantry, 36th Infantry Division
  • Place and date: Magliano, Italy, 14 June 1944
  • Entered service al: Baton Rouge, La.
  • G.O. No.: 90, 8 December 1944
  • Citation: While his platoon was pinned down by enemy small-arms fire from both flanks, he left his position of comparative safety and assisted in carrying 1 of his men, who had been seriously wounded and who lay in an exposed position, to a point where he could receive medical attention. The advance of the platoon was resumed but was again stopped by enemy frontal fire. A German officer and 2 enlisted men, armed with automatic weapons, threatened the right flank. Fearlessly exposing himself, he moved to a position from which he killed all 3 with his submachine gun. Returning to his squad, he obtained an Ml rifle and several antitank grenades, then took up a position from which he delivered accurate fire on the enemy holding up the advance. As the battalion moved forward it was again stopped by enemy frontal and flanking fire. He procured an automatic rifle and, advancing ahead of his men, neutralized an enemy machinegun with his fire. When the flanking fire became more intense he ran to a nearby tank and exposing himself on the turret, restored a jammed machinegun to operating efficiency and used it so effectively that the enemy fire from an adjacent ridge was materially reduced thus permitting the battalion to occupy its objective.

https://history.army.mil/moh/wwII-t-z.html#WISE

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